Laptop PC RAM Size and Performance Explained (2018)

Laptop RAM - Size and Performance

RAM (Random Access Memory) is also referred to as system memory. It is a computer part which temporarily carries software and files in current use. It enables the processor to access data much faster in comparison to accessing data on storage devices such as a hard drive (HDD) or solid state drive (SSD). HDDs and SSDs hold software and files in a more permanent way, until a user uninstalls or deletes them. Software and files in RAM are loaded from these storage devices and are removed from RAM when an application is closed or operating system is shut down.

The most important positive effect of having a larger RAM size in a laptop or other kind of computer is its greater multi-tasking potential. Said differently, a greater capability to run more programs simultaneously without slowing down overall computing speed or crashing the operating system. In this article we will explain how many Gigabytes (GB) of RAM you actually need and how does its size and other characteristics affect laptops’ performance.

Common Laptop RAM Sizes

The most common RAM size you can find in everyday laptop PCs nowadays is 8GB. Some lower-end models come with 4GB and in some cases only 2GB. Higher-end mainstream laptop models oftentimes feature 12GB and 16GB. You can find high-performance gaming laptops and mobile workstations with 24 or even 32 Gigabytes, too. Available laptop memory modules (SODIMM module format as opposed desktop PC-use DIMM) usually have 4GB or 8GB capacity. 16GB SODIMM modules are still a rarity and aren’t compatible with all notebook models on the market. 6GB SODIMMs don’t exist on the market. Select laptops do come with 6GB RAM, but these have a 4GB module paired with a 2GB module.

Today’s laptops usually have two RAM slots. Some small and budget models have with only one or no slots. The laptops with no RAM slots have system memory soldered onto the motherboard. On the other side, select gaming and mobile workstation notebooks have four. It’s also possible to find a laptop with soldered RAM combined with a RAM slot for expansion.

How Much RAM You Need in Laptop with Windows?

The best way to find out how much RAM you need in a laptop or any other kind of computer is to calculate it by summing RAM footprints of software you typically use. In the table below, you can see typical RAM usage of Windows 10 operating system and its background services, as well as RAM usage of some popular Windows software and game titles. Using the table, you can easily calculate what RAM capacity you need and how many programs you can run at the same time without exceeding RAM size and choking the system. For instance, if you add heavy web browsing in Chrome and 10 images opened in Paint.net image editor on top of RAM used by OS itself and an antivirus running in the background (Avast for example), you will get a needed RAM amount of at least 2.64 Gigabytes. Or, if you run only the latest Call of Duty game on Windows with no additional programs opened you’ll need more than 4GB right of the bat.

Software RAM Usage in Gigabytes (GB)*
Windows 10 Home 64-bit (Latest, with Default Services Running in Background) – Idle 1.70
Avast Security Software: Idle 0.03
Avast Security Software: Antivirus Scan 0.05
Chrome: Light Web Browsing (Facebook, NBA.com, Gmail and Google Search opened) 0.30
Internet Explorer: Light Web Browsing (Facebook, NBA.com, Gmail and Google Search opened) 0.28
Chrome: Heavy Web Browsing (Facebook, NBA.com, Gmail, Google Search, 9GAG, Reddit, Pinterest, and 10-Minute YouTube 480p video opened) 0.70
Microsoft Edge: Heavy Web Browsing  (Facebook, NBA.com, Gmail, Google Search, 9GAG, Reddit, Pinterest, and 10-Minute YouTube 480p video
opened)
0.75
YouTube 10-Minute 1080p Video Playback in Chrome 0.35
YouTube 10-Minute 1080p Video Playback in Internet Explorer 0.40
VLC Media Player: 120-Minute 1080p Video Playback 0.10
Windows Media Player: 4-Minute MP3 Audio Track Playback 0.01
Windows Photo Viewier: 4928x3264px Photo Opened 0.02
Microsoft Word: 1,000-Word 1-Image Document Editing 0.10
Excel: 100-Row 10-Column Spreadsheet Editing 0.03
Adobe Reader: 100-Page PDF Document Viewing 0.09
Paint.net Image Editor: 1 5MB 4928x3264px Photo Opened 0.10
Paint.net Image Editor: 10 5MB 4928x3264px Photos Opened 0.71
Paint.net Image Editor: Applying Blur Effect on 5MB 4928x3264px Photo 0.17
Windows Movie Maker: Importing 5-Minute 1080p Video for Editing (Transcoding) 0.16
Windows Movie Maker: Editing 1080p Video with Transition Effects 0.10
Windows Movie Maker: Exporting 1080p MOV Video to MP4 File 0.75
Windows Mail 0.11
Outlook Mail 0.10
Skype: Voice Call 0.20
uTorrent: Movie Download 0.09
Steam Game Client 0.01
League of Legends Game 0.75
Minecraft Game 0.65
Counter Strike – Global Offensive Game 1.10
Dota 2 Game 1.00
The Elder Scrolls V – Skyrim Game 0.50
Call of Duty – Advanced Warfare Game 3.70

*Values in the table are approximate.

As a side note, if you own a laptop with integrated graphics, such as the Intel HD series, it will take a certain amount of RAM for graphics processing purposes. For instance, the Intel HD in a laptop with 4GB reduces the available size to 3.9GB by default. During gaming, it can occupy up to 2GB. Discrete laptop video cards like the Nvidia GeForce series don’t use RAM for graphics, since they have their own dedicated video memory.

It’s also worth noting that 32-bit versions of operating systems can’t utilize more than 4GB of RAM, even if you physically have more in your laptop. Thankfully, most laptops on the market have 64-bit Windows pre-installed.

RAM and Laptop’s Performance

If your RAM needs exceed the amount you have in your computer and you still decide to run all the programs you wish at the same time, that doesn’t mean your system will automatically crash. Windows will use your notebook’s storage space – hard drive or solid state drive, for RAM purposes thanks to so called virtual memory technology. But that’ll slow down operation a lot, since reading and writing data on HDDs and SSDs is much slower in comparison to RAM’s read/write speeds. In the worst case scenario, the system will become completely unresponsive, so you’ll have to restart it by pressing the power button on your machine and lose unsaved documents you worked on during the session.

On the other side, having a large RAM size in cases your usage doesn’t exceed it has no significant positive impact on overall performance of the system. True, having larger RAM than needed won’t hurt. SuperFetch technology included in Windows 7, 8, and 10 operating systems will make use of it. SuperFetch monitors which applications you run often and pre-loads them into free RAM space. This enables faster loading of commonly used software, without reducing multitasking performance of already opened programs.

What can also have an effect performance-wise, but a minor one, is speed of memory. More precisely, speed of communication between RAM and the processor. In product specs sheets of laptops and their memory, RAM speed is expressed in Megahertz (MHz) values. Motherboards and processors of modern laptops usually support 2133, 1866, and 1600 MHz memory speeds. Some high-end laptops additionally support 2400 MHz.

Other RAM characteristics such as latencies and single-channel versus dual-channel RAM configurations are maybe important for PC enthusiasts who want to make use of every bit of PCs’ potential. But, these specs don’t impact performance in a meaningful way for the vast majority of laptop users. In short, if other parameters are the same, lower latency and use of dual-channel memory setups (i.e. 2 x 4GB versus 1 x 8GB) are better. As a side note, dual-channel memory can noticeably improve gaming capabilities of a laptop if it relies on integrated graphics for gaming, as opposed to dedicated video cards.

As for RAM upgrades, it’s important to know that there are different types of SODIMM memory, such as DDR4, DDR3, DDR3L, or older and discontinued DDR2 and DDR. If you plan to upgrade RAM in your laptop these differences are of a crucial importance, since RAM modules have to be compatible with the device you’re upgrading.

Danijel Z

On Laptoping, Danijel writes about Windows-based laptop, 2-in-1, and tablet PCs.

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21 thoughts on “Laptop PC RAM Size and Performance Explained (2018)”

  1. Sir
    I want to upgrade 8gb ram in my sony laptop VPCEG28FN
    Is this available in market ??and where I wanna search
    For NUKE app is it support to work without buffer

  2. Hello Sir.
    Please I want to buy a Laptop that I can use to give lectures to students. Could you pls recommend for me together with RAM and SSD or Os

  3. Hello Sir,

    I am in need to get 16GB RAM for HADOOP but which is like somewhat expensive. So I decided to go with 12GB(1*4GB&1*8GB) laptop with 120$ difference. Can I change the 4GB slot with 8GB???

    Is it preferable?
    Suggest me, please

    Thank you in advance

    1. What laptop model is in question? Many of the modern laptops have 4GB soldered onto the motherboard and a free RAM slot for additional / removable memory. So on some models getting more than 12GB can’t be done without investing in a pricey single 16GB RAM module. If the laptop has 2 slots for removable RAM then you can have 8GB x2 configuration.

  4. Sir,
    i bought asus x540u laptop it has 4gb ram. what is the max ram capacity of it and how many slot?i want to upgrade it . thanks

    1. Hi, as far as i know the X540U has on-board 4GB RAM, plus a DDR4 RAM slot for expansion. So most likely you’ll only need to get a DDR4 RAM module and insert it.

    1. Yes, Windows 8 can work perfectly with 4GB RAM, but you won’t be able to run too many programs at the same time without slowdowns. Yet, for most users 4GB is enough for multi-tasking under Windows.

  5. I bought my 2 little girls hp pavilion, they come with 2 slots, 2gb ram each ,I’d like to add an 8gb ram to each laptop, u think they would run properly with 8 and 2 combination?

    1. Generally, 2GB and 8GB should work together without problems if other RAM specs match system’s requirements. But, it’s hard to tell in this particular case, since we don’t know the exact model of the HP Pavilion. What model is in question?

    2. It’s usually bad practice to mix RAM up and can sometimes end up slowing down the system altogether.
      If you’re looking for 8gb max then get 2x4Gb.

    1. If you’re an average PC user, 8GB means you can run many programs and browser tabs simultaneously without RAM-related slowdowns. Even 4GB and 6GB are enough for most users. Only a few very demanding games might exceed 8GB limit.

  6. Hi Daniel
    It was realy helpfull for me. Now I know what’s to do and how.
    Best regards
    Pawel Jop

  7. Hi Danijel i ve recently bought a lap “HP inspiron ab523TX” because it comes with only 4gb ddr3 1600mhzram i ve upgraded it to 12gb ddr3 1600mhz the same day i bought it. But i added a 8gb ddr3 ram. Does this affect my pc s performance bcoz one is 4 and other is 8? I think my pc is a bit slow for a 12gb i5 6th and crashed 3 times in a week. Fyi added ram is from adata. Plz reply asap

    1. Your upgrade to 12GB makes a difference performance-wise only if your RAM usage exceeds 4GB (in situations like running many programs at the same time). If you’re below 4GB threshold all the time you won’t see a meaningful difference. Exception is gaming on the Intel HD series integrated graphics, since having two RAM modules in dual-channel memory setup improves gaming performance over single-channel / single module setups. I don’t think asymmetric RAM size in your slots makes any difference when it comes to performance. There are some other RAM specs which affect performance – like memory latencies, but they have a minor effect on overall computer performance. As for system crashes, there can be various reasons for that, like overheating due to dust in the vents or some kind of software / drivers error. If your system is stable when you use only the old RAM module, maybe the new one causes the crashes.

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